Climate warning
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Government of Kenya

Climate warning

The return of charcoal? State rethinking ban to spread gains

Despite its documented role in deforestation and forest degradation, policymakers are slowly coming around to the idea of embracing charcoal production and trade in the country to fully harness its economic potential but also to sustainably regulate it. The move to “decriminalise” charcoal trade and to build on its multi-billion value chain is gaining steam within top echelons of Kenya Kwanza administration, as much as it’s a hot potato. In July, President William Ruto publicly lifted a moratorium on logging raising hue and cry in the country. The High Court later temporarily suspended the President’s move, saying the process leading to the lifting of the moratorium lacked public participation, and was, therefore, unconstitutional, null and void. Around the same time, Kenya Forest Service announced a resolve to resurrect the “shamba system” in a bid to establish 54,000 hectares of commercial plantations in the unstocked areas within degraded natural forest areas. Under the scheme, forest-adjacent communities are allowed to cultivate agricultural crops during the early stages of forest establishment. Coming hot on the heels of these two related developments, a re-think on the charcoal trade is likely to stoke public outcry. A recent “freedom café” to discuss a policy paper on combating charcoal, firewood trade and illegal logging was told that under the Bottom-Up Economic Transformation Agenda (BETA), Kenya Kwanza administration is committed to turn the fortunes around charcoal. The “freedom café” is a regular platform under the Friedrich Naumann Foundation where Kenyans gather to freely discuss topics of interest, usually revolving around a policy initiative. https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/the-standard/article/2001484644/the-return-of-charcoal-state-rethinking-ban-to-spread-gains

Do you agree?

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  • Grace Njeri

    11 w

    Charcoal burning increases the severity of climate change by advancing global warming,it must therefore be discouraged.

    3
    • CHRIS NGATIA

      12 w

      This is not right at all ... They need to rethink their decisions before making our planet alot messier

      5
      • Rashid Kamau

        12 w

        Charcoal production has been at the fore-front fueling the death of our forests,there should be no time to rethink about the ban.

        3
        • CHRIS NGATIA

          12 w

          @rashid_kamau they should not even think about it

          1
        • Esther Wanjiku

          12 w

          This is not the time for the Kenyan government to go back to policies that ran out of grace ages ago.

          4
        • Kevin

          12 w

          Charcoal trade is and remains to be the biggest threat to the existence of proper forest cover in Kenya.

          3
          • Esther Wanjiku

            12 w

            @Kevin Truer words have not been spoken

            2
          • Tabitha Kimani

            12 w

            This is a rogue government that seems to have no vision about the future.

            4
            • We Don't Have Time

              12 w

              Dear johnte ndeto Your climate warning has received over 50 agrees! We have reached out to Government of Kenya by email and requested a response. I will keep you updated on any progress! To reach more people and increase the chance of a response, click the Share button above to share the review on your social accounts. For every new member that joins We Don't Have Time from your network, we will plant a tree and attribute it to you! /Adam, We Don't Have Time

              3
              • Rukia Ahmed Abdi

                12 w

                This article explores the reconsideration of a ban on charcoal production and trade in Kenya, highlighting policymakers' shift in perspective to harness its economic potential while striving for sustainable regulation. The move to "decriminalize" charcoal trade is gaining traction within the Kenyan administration, despite concerns about deforestation and forest degradation associated with charcoal production. The article notes recent developments, including the lifting of a moratorium on logging by President William Ruto and the Kenya Forest Service's initiative to establish commercial plantations using the "shamba system." This system allows forest-adjacent communities to cultivate crops during the early stages of forest establishment. The potential rethinking of the charcoal trade is expected to generate public debate, especially in the context of environmental concerns. The article mentions a "freedom café" discussion focused on combating charcoal trade, firewood trade, and illegal logging. It indicates that, under the Bottom-Up Economic Transformation Agenda (BETA), the Kenyan administration aims to transform the fortunes of charcoal production, suggesting a commitment to balancing economic interests with environmental sustainability.

                3
                • George Kariuki

                  12 w

                  It's just a matter of time for this to agregates to deforestation and forest degradation.

                  3
                  • CHRIS NGATIA

                    12 w

                    @george_kariuki definitely the approval of charcoal use will lead to deforestation of the highest rate

                    1
                  • Joseph Githinji

                    13 w

                    The government of Kenya must understand that climate action is not a cheap affair but on the other hand , climate degredation is expensive and can finish the whole planet. Kenya must stick to the right decision and be ready to pay the cost. I oppose charcoal production.

                    8
                    • CHRIS NGATIA

                      12 w

                      @joseph_githinji they need to make a right decision not based on greed but the health risk associated with it's use

                      1
                    • Elizabeth Gathigia

                      13 w

                      I strongly oppose charcoal production it will end up increasing deforestation which will lead to a irreversible damage, thus has to be stopped with all means possible

                      4
                      • Joseph Githinji

                        13 w

                        @elizbeth_gathigia I second you, our forests are vital in creating a habitable and sustainable environment.

                        3
                        • CHRIS NGATIA

                          12 w

                          @elizbeth_gathigia very true 💯

                          1
                        • Princess

                          13 w

                          The reconsideration of the charcoal ban is alarming, as it may lead to increased deforestation and environmental degradation.

                          7
                          • walter lungayi

                            13 w

                            @princess_nel_268 I strongly agree with you.

                            3
                            • Joseph Githinji

                              13 w

                              @princess_nel_268 it is absurd and the head of state must stand firm to stop charcoal burning to boom again.

                              3
                            • Edwin wangombe

                              13 w

                              It is time to criminalize charcoal burning in Kenya... charcoal burning and its use is very harmful to the environment and the people and should be stopped with immediate effect... President Ruto and his administration should formulate a permanent solution to this problem once and for all to save Mother Nature.

                              16
                              • Jane Wangui

                                13 w

                                @edwin_wangombe The moment they lift the ban, every tree ever planted will be at a risk of being cut down. We will also loose some indigenous trees that have existed longer than we have.

                                16
                                • walter lungayi

                                  13 w

                                  @jane_wangui True

                                  3
                                  • Joseph Githinji

                                    13 w

                                    @edwin_wangombe True, charcoal production should be a thing of the past already, it is sad when we make promises and policies that we go around and change.

                                    3
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