Climate warning
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County Government 047

Climate warning

Concrete Jungle or Urban Oasis? Public park or Private park?

The recent closures of public parks like Uhuru Park, coupled with the introduction of pay-per-entry policies and the extensive construction of concrete walkways and buildings, raise serious concerns about the future of our city's green spaces and the well-being of its residents. These actions, seemingly intended to generate revenue and modernize the park, are instead detrimental to the environment and ultimately harmful to the public they claim to serve.

Firstly, the privatization of access to public parks through pay-per-entry fees creates a barrier for many residents, particularly the less privileged. This effectively disenfranchises a significant portion of the population from enjoying the free benefits of green spaces, including fresh air, physical activity, and mental well-being. Parks are meant to be accessible to all, not exclusive havens for those who can afford it. What is this obsession with making money out of everything? Are you trying to tax the happiness of Kenyans? It would seem that whatever brings people joy you want to curtail that and put it behind a pay screen.

Secondly, the vast construction of concrete walkways and buildings within Uhuru Park represents a significant loss of vital green space. Concrete absorbs heat, exacerbates the urban heat island effect, and contributes to climate change. It also replaces the natural filtering capacity of vegetation, leading to increased air and water pollution. This transformation from lush greenery to a concrete jungle not only diminishes the park's aesthetic value but also eliminates its crucial role in mitigating the environmental challenges facing our city.

Thirdly, the loss of green space negatively impacts the physical and mental health of residents. Parks provide opportunities for exercise, relaxation, and social interaction, all of which are essential for a healthy and fulfilling life. Studies have shown that access to green spaces reduces stress, lowers blood pressure, and improves mental well-being. By replacing green spaces with concrete, the Nairobi County Government is depriving residents of these vital resources and contributing to an unhealthy urban environment.

Furthermore, the construction within Uhuru Park disregards the historical and cultural significance of the space. Uhuru Park is a symbol of freedom and national pride, serving as a gathering place for significant events and celebrations. The extensive construction activities not only damage the park's natural beauty but also disrespect its historical importance and its role in the collective memory of the city.

Image of post in post detailed view


Instead of pursuing policies that exclude and harm residents, the Nairobi County Government should focus on preserving and enhancing public green spaces. This includes:

(I) Opening parks to the public free of charge.
(II) Prioritizing maintenance and rehabilitation of existing green spaces.
(III) Investing in sustainable infrastructure that minimizes environmental impact.
(IV) Engaging with the community to develop plans for park use and management.
(V) Preserving the historical and cultural significance of public parks.

By prioritizing the well-being of residents, protecting the environment, and respecting our city's heritage, the Nairobi County Government can ensure that Uhuru Park and other public green spaces remain vibrant and accessible for generations to come. Let us not turn our urban oasis into a concrete jungle. Let us choose a future where nature and humanity thrive together.

Do you agree?

48 more agrees trigger social media ads

  • winnie nguru

    17 w

    We do not need modern parks, we need our environment intact. Stop reaping money by destroying natural parks and replacing them with modern ones just to earn from it.

    7
    • Joseph Githinji

      17 w

      @winnie_nguru true , we need to respect the natural habitats and keep them intact.

      2
    • Rukia Ahmed Abdi

      17 w

      The recent trend of closing public parks and implementing pay-per-entry policies, coupled with extensive construction in Uhuru Park, raises concerns about the future of Nairobi's green spaces. Privatization through entry fees creates barriers, disproportionately affecting less privileged residents. The concrete expansion not only contributes to the urban heat island effect and climate change but also diminishes the health benefits of green spaces. Instead of prioritizing revenue generation, the Nairobi County Government should focus on preserving public parks, ensuring free access, and investing in sustainable infrastructure. Let's choose a future where nature and humanity thrive together, avoiding the transformation of our urban oasis into a concrete jungle.

      9
      • George Kariuki

        17 w

        This is unacceptable. By working together, we can ensure that Nairobi's public parks remain a source of joy, health, and well-being for all residents.

        5
        • Joseph Githinji

          17 w

          @george_kariuki true, the government must focus on making this happen, we all need the public parks to work.

          3
        • johnte ndeto

          17 w

          This should stop

          5
          • Joseph Githinji

            17 w

            The Nairobi county government must stop this and respect all the natural habitats for our animals. Protection of nature is paramount and this must be protected.

            12
            • winnie nguru

              17 w

              @joseph_githinji they should! it is wrong by all means

              3
            • Princess

              18 w

              It seems like they're doing it to make money and modernize the park, but it's actually bad for the environment and the people.

              12
              • Joseph Githinji

                17 w

                @princess_nel_268 sure, this sounds alarming and the nature must be protected gerously without propagation of people's interests.

                6
                • winnie nguru

                  17 w

                  @princess_nel_268 true, it does not benefit anybody or the planet that they are doing this

                  3
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